X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak

The X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak vulnerability occurs when the application exposes sensitive information about its backend server in the HTTP response headers. Attackers can use this information to launch sophisticated attacks.

The X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak vulnerability is a common issue that web applications can face. It occurs when the application exposes sensitive information about its backend server in the HTTP response headers. Attackers can use this information to gather details about the web server, operating system, and software versions, which they can use to launch more sophisticated attacks.

To fix the X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak vulnerability, we need to remove the X-Backend-Server header from the application's HTTP response headers. In this guide, we will provide a step-by-step approach to removing this header using different web application frameworks.

Identify the web application framework being used:

  1. The first step to fixing the X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak vulnerability is to identify the web application framework being used. Different frameworks have different methods of removing response headers. Common frameworks include ASP.NET, Ruby on Rails, Django, and Flask.

Locate the response header file:

  1. Once you have identified the framework, locate the file responsible for sending the response headers. In most cases, this file is named "web.config," "application.rb," "settings.py," or "app.py."

Remove the X-Backend-Server header:

  1. After identifying the response header file, locate the X-Backend-Server header and remove it from the list of headers being sent. In some frameworks, this header might be added by default, while in others, it might be added by third-party libraries.

Save the changes:

  1. Save the changes to the response header file and test the application to ensure that it is working correctly. If the application is not functioning as expected, review the changes made to the response header file to ensure that no other headers have been inadvertently removed or altered.

Now that we have an overview of the process let's see how to remove the X-Backend-Server header in some popular web application frameworks:

Fixing X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak in ASP.NET:

  1. Open the web.config file for the ASP.NET application.
  2. Locate the <httpProtocol> element.

Add the following line of code inside the <httpProtocol> element:

<customHeaders>

<remove name="X-Backend-Server" />

  1. </customHeaders>
  2. Save the changes and test the application.

Fixing X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak in Ruby on Rails:

  1. Open the application.rb file for the Ruby on Rails application.

Add the following line of code inside the config block:

  1. config.action_dispatch.default_headers.delete('X-Backend-Server')
  2. Save the changes and test the application.

Fixing X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak in Django:

  1. Open the settings.py file for the Django application.

Add the following line of code at the end of the file:

del middleware_classes[middleware_classes.index('django.middleware.security.SecurityMiddleware')]

  1. middleware_classes = ('django.middleware.security.SecurityMiddleware',) + tuple([m for m in middleware_classes if m != 'django.middleware.security.SecurityMiddleware'])
  2. Save the changes and test the application.

Fixing X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak in Flask:

  1. Open the app.py file for the Flask application.

Add the following line of code at the beginning of the file:

  1. from flask import Flask, Response

Add the following line of code after creating the Flask object:

@app.after_request

def remove_header(response):

response.headers['X-Backend-Server'] = ''

  1. return response
  2. Save the changes and test the application.

Conclusion:

The X-Backend-Server Header Information Leak vulnerability is a critical issue that can be easily fixed by removing the X-Backend-Server header from the HTTP response headers.

Achieve SOC2 Compliance

We make your startup SOC2 compliant by implementing and managing the required security controls for you.

Get Started

Latest Articles