Server Leaks its Webserver Application via 'Server' HTTP Response Header Field

"Server Leaks its Webserver Application via 'Server' HTTP Response Header Field" vulnerability is a security issue that allows attackers to identify the technology stack of the web server, including its version and operating system, and use this information to launch further attacks.

Server Leaks its Webserver Application via 'Server' HTTP Response Header Field vulnerability is a security issue that allows attackers to identify the technology stack of the web server, including its version and operating system, and use this information to launch further attacks. To fix this vulnerability, the server should be configured to hide or modify the "Server" header field.

Here is a step-by-step guide on how to fix the Server leaks its web server application information via the "Server" HTTP response header field vulnerability:

Step 1: Identify the web server software

Before you can fix the vulnerability, you need to identify the web server software that is being used. There are several ways to do this, but the easiest is to look at the "Server" header field in the HTTP response. You can use a web browser's developer tools, such as Chrome's DevTools, or a command-line tool, such as curl or telnet, to make a request to the web server and inspect the response headers.

For example, using curl to make a request to the web server:

curl -I https://example.com

This will output the response headers, including the "Server" field:

HTTP/2 200 server: Apache/2.4.7 (Ubuntu)

In this example, the web server software is Apache version 2.4.7 running on Ubuntu.

Step 2: Modify the web server configuration

Once you have identified the web server software, you need to modify its configuration to remove or modify the "Server" header field. The exact steps to do this depend on the web server software being used, but here are some examples for popular web servers:

Apache:

Edit the Apache configuration file, typically located at /etc/apache2/apache2.conf or /etc/httpd/httpd.conf, and add the following line:

ServerTokens Prod

This will set the "Server" header field to "Apache" without any version information.

Nginx:

Edit the Nginx configuration file, typically located at /etc/nginx/nginx.conf, and add the following line:

server_tokens off;

This will completely remove the "Server" header field.

IIS:

Open the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager and select the server node in the left-hand pane. In the center pane, double-click on the "Server Headers" feature. In the "HTTP Response Headers" dialog, click on the "Remove" link next to the "Server" header.

Step 3: Verify the fix

After modifying the web server configuration, you should verify that the "Server" header field no longer leaks information about the web server software. You can use the same tools as in step 1 to make a request to the web server and inspect the response headers.

For example, using curl to make a request to the web server:

curl -I https://example.com

This should output the response headers without the "Server" field or with a modified value:

HTTP/2 200

Step 4: Test for other vulnerabilities

Fixing the Server leaks its web server application information via the "Server" HTTP response header field vulnerability is only one step in securing your web application. There may be other vulnerabilities that can be identified by external vulnerability scanners or manual testing.

To ensure the security of your web application, you should perform a comprehensive security assessment that includes testing for other vulnerabilities, such as SQL injection, cross-site scripting (XSS), and other common web application vulnerabilities.

Step 5: Stay up-to-date with security patches

Web server software, as well as web application frameworks and libraries, are constantly updated to address security vulnerabilities. It is important to stay up-to-date with security patches and updates to ensure the security of your web application. This includes both the web server software and any third-party libraries and frameworks that your web application uses.

You should regularly check for security updates and patches for your web server software, and install them as soon as possible. You can typically do this using your operating system's package manager, or by downloading and installing the updates from the web server software vendor's website.

In addition, you should regularly check for security updates and patches for any third-party libraries and frameworks that your web application uses. Many libraries and frameworks have their own security mailing lists or RSS feeds that you can subscribe to in order to receive notifications about security updates and patches.

Conclusion:

The Server leaks its web server application information via the "Server" HTTP response header field vulnerability is a serious security issue that can be easily fixed by modifying the web server configuration to hide or modify the "Server" header field. However, fixing this vulnerability is only one step in securing your web application, and you should also perform a comprehensive security assessment to identify and address any other vulnerabilities. Additionally, you should stay up-to-date with security patches and updates to ensure the ongoing security of your web application.

Achieve SOC2 Compliance

We make your startup SOC2 compliant by implementing and managing the required security controls for you.

Get Started